What Workers Are Most Likely to be Exposed to PFAS?

Certain types of industries and workers are more likely to be exposed to PFAS chemicals than others. These include:

Firefighters: PFAS are commonly used in firefighting foams, which can lead to exposure during training exercises and actual firefighting operations. Firefighters may inhale PFAS-containing foam mist or come into contact with contaminated gear and equipment.

Chemical manufacturing workers: Employees involved in the production of PFAS or products containing these chemicals may be exposed through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion of contaminated dust or vapors.

Textile and carpet manufacturing workers: PFAS are used to provide stain-resistant and water-repellent properties to fabrics and carpets. Workers in these industries may be exposed during the manufacturing process or when handling treated materials.

Paper and packaging workers: Some food packaging materials, such as pizza boxes and fast-food wrappers, may contain PFAS to prevent grease and moisture from seeping through. Workers involved in the production of these materials may be at risk of exposure.

Electroplating and chrome plating workers: PFAS are used in some chrome plating processes to reduce surface tension and improve the quality of the plating. Workers in these industries may be exposed through inhalation or skin contact with PFAS-containing mists or solutions.

Ski wax technicians: Some ski waxes contain PFAS to enhance the performance of skis on snow. Ski wax technicians who apply these products may be exposed through inhalation or skin contact.

Waste management and recycling workers: PFAS can be released from products during the waste management and recycling process, potentially exposing workers who handle these materials.

Airport and military personnel: PFAS-containing firefighting foams are often used in training exercises and emergency response situations at airports and military bases. Personnel involved in these activities may be at risk of exposure.

Dental professionals: Some dental floss and dental restorative materials contain PFAS. Dental professionals who frequently use these products may be exposed through inhalation or skin contact.

Automotive manufacturing workers: PFAS are used in various automotive applications, such as lubricants, seals, and wire coatings. Workers involved in the production or maintenance of these components may be at risk of exposure.

Construction workers: Certain building materials, such as paints, sealants, and adhesives, may contain PFAS. Construction workers who regularly work with these products may be exposed through inhalation or skin contact.

Semiconductor manufacturing workers: PFAS are used in the production of semiconductors as part of the photolithography process. Workers in this industry may be exposed during the manufacturing process.

Leather tanning workers: Some PFAS are used in the leather tanning process to provide water and stain resistance. Workers involved in leather production may be at risk of exposure.

Medical professionals: Certain medical devices, such as surgical gowns and drapes, may be treated with PFAS to provide liquid barrier protection. Medical professionals who frequently use these items may be exposed.

Oil and gas workers: PFAS are used in some drilling fluids and hydraulic fracturing fluids in the oil and gas industry. Workers involved in these operations may be at risk of exposure.

Painting and coating workers: Some paints and coatings, particularly those used in industrial and automotive applications, may contain PFAS. Workers who apply these products may be exposed through inhalation or skin contact.

Photographic industry workers: PFAS have been used in photographic film and paper coatings to provide moisture resistance and static control. Workers in the photographic industry may be exposed during the manufacturing or processing of these materials.

Laboratory technicians: PFAS are used in various laboratory applications, such as liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Laboratory technicians who work with these chemicals or PFAS-containing samples may be at risk of exposure.


Posted

in

by

Tags:

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *